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 STOKE-ON-TRENT, NEWCASTLE-UNDER-LYME, STAFFORDSHIRE MOORLANDS, SOUTH CHESHIRE

Orthodontist achieves gold for Keep Stoke Smiling

A leading orthodontist from University Hospitals of North Midlands NHS Trust was today awarded the prestigious Colyer Gold Medal from the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) –the highest accolades available from the College.


Dr Karen Juggins, consultant orthodontist based at Royal Stoke University Hospital, was nominated for her significant contribution to the development of orthodontic standards and her role in launching the Keep Stoke Smiling campaign to encourage young people to look after their teeth and promote a great smile. The medal was presented on Tuesday 7 March at the Royal College, Lincoln’s Inn Fields.

Founded by the Faculty of Dental Surgery in 1951 to honour the service of dental surgeon and historian Sir Frank Colyer, the medal is awarded at irregular intervals "for liberal acts or distinguished labours, researches and discoveries eminently conducive to the improvement of natural knowledge and of the healing art".

Dr Juggins has been a consultant at UHNM since 2007 having held previous positions at University Hospitals Oxford and University College London. She is also an examiner for Royal College of Surgeons, a member of the College’s Clinical Standards Committee as well as Chair of Publications and Media for the British Orthodontic Society.

She said: “I am absolutely delighted to be awarded the Colyer Gold Medal. I am truly honoured to have been nominated and it is humbling to be among some of the previous worthy recipients.”

Keep Stoke Smiling is a social media and community-driven campaign targeting teenagers and young adults to encourage and promote the benefits of looking after their teeth and was launched by Dr Juggins in 2018 after seeing the devastating effects of sugary drinks on her young patients.

She said: “What really made me decide to launch the campaign was the referral of a 10-year-old boy whose dentist wanted to know if orthodontics could help close the gap that would be left when his four front teeth were to be extracted due to dental decay. He told me he drank at least three cans of coke a day and took a can to bed with him at night. He needed a denture to replace his extracted teeth.”

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