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 STOKE-ON-TRENT, NEWCASTLE-UNDER-LYME, STAFFORDSHIRE MOORLANDS, SOUTH CHESHIRE

THOUSANDS OF LONG-LASTING ROOTS PUT DOWN IN THE COMMUNITY


Newcastle’s urban planting projects will plant their 25,000th tree this winter.

Over the last three years Newcastle-under-Lyme Borough Council has planted 14,947 trees at 21 green spaces, while residents and businesses have planted another 9,995 saplings though a Britain in Bloom campaign.

As well as promising to break the 25,000 mark this winter, the council is committed to keeping existing trees fit and healthy.

David Hutchison, Newcastle-under-Lyme Borough Council's Cabinet member for Sustainable Environment, said: “This an investment in the future by planting trees now that will mature in 20 or 30 years.

“Not only will they improve the landscape, they will make a huge contribution to carbon capture and off-setting emissions as we move towards net carbon zero.”

Subject to consultation with residents the intention is to plant more trees this winter at green spaces at the Dingle in Bradwell; Grange Lane Community Centre; Betley Place, Clayton; Earls Drive, Clayton; Wolstanton Marsh; and Wye Road.

Nearly 10,000 of the trees have been planted in the borough via the authority’s link-up with Britain Bloom’s Plant a Blooming’ Tree project, which encourages people to make a personal contribution to offsetting carbon emissions.

All the trees will be a range of native broadleaf, woodland planting and fruit trees and the programme complements the council’s policy of formally protecting 60 green spaces across the borough from development.

Part of the borough’s completed planting programme includes the creation of Lyme Forest, to mark the 850th anniversary in 2023 of the granting of Newcastle-under-Lyme’s first Royal Charter. A total of 850 limes, plus other deciduous trees, placed on the northern boundary of the former Keele Golf Course in Silverdale, acknowledge the borough’s historic link with ‘The Forest of Lyme’, which was once said to span tracts of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire.

David Hutchison added: “Once a tree reaches maturity it may live for several hundred years, each year absorbing tons of carbon dioxide and replacing it with oxygen.

“By planting thousands of trees which may outlast our grandchildren’s grandchildren, we’re making a long-lasting commitment to make our communities a better place.”

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